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Your career

No two careers in Nursing and Midwifery are the same. There are so many different career options that whatever your interests, experience or passion there will be a role for you at NUH.

Below you will see the variety of career pathways we have on offer at NUH. Read and discover more about the different roles we have on offer and the skills and experience needed to reach your goal.

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You can request a Careers Advice Meeting to discuss your career options. Click the 'Request Careers Advice' button to contact us.

Clinical and specialist roles

Some roles within a clinical career are hospital based, in wards, outpatient units or specialist departments. Increasingly care takes place in the community – whether that’s in patients’ own homes, in clinics, GP surgeries, walk-in treatment centers or nursing homes. At NUH we are proud that we have community and sexual health services within the Nottinghamshire region also.

As a nurse in a clinical career, the impact you have on other people’s health and wellbeing is huge. It can be instant, if you work in critical or emergency care, or it may take longer, for example helping someone to become more independent at home. Either way, witnessing that positive change in someone is very rewarding.

I get to work as part of a great team, with a fantastic support network consisting of managers, educators and a dedicated multidisciplinary team that is patient focused.

Rebecca Guy, Staff Nurse

Clinical and Specialist Career Pathway

Some roles within a clinical career are hospital based, in wards, outpatient units or specialist departments. Increasingly care takes place in the community – whether that’s in patients’ own homes, in clinics, GP surgeries, walk-in treatment centers or nursing homes. At NUH we are proud that we have community and sexual health services within the Nottinghamshire region also.

As a nurse in a clinical career, the impact you have on other people’s health and wellbeing is huge. It can be instant, if you work in critical or emergency care, or it may take longer, for example helping someone to become more independent at home. Either way, witnessing that positive change in someone is very rewarding.

 

I get great satisfaction when the care we have delivered to a patient in a timely manner has prevented an admission to Critical Care and the patient has received the right treatment at the right time by the right people.

Emma Beale, Critical Care Outreach Nurse- Deputy Sister.

 

I enjoy caring for patients from different specialties, developing my knowledge. I like how my role is varied and I am not based in one place.

Natalie Spieby, OPAT Nurse

 

I really like working in ED. I love the variety and the relationships we develop with other specialties. It’s a great place to work – a different challenge every day.

Dominic Purnell, Advanced Nurse Practitioner.

Education Career Pathway

Nurses and midwives in education are in great demand, and often the transition from nursing to teaching is a natural one for many people. If you want to impact the future of healthcare, and share your passion for nursing with future clinicians, you may find nurse education to be a very rewarding field.

It allows me to help newly qualified nurses and nurses from a non-acute background to transform from a competent new nurse into a confident one.

Donna Buckley, Practice Educator

 

I love using my knowledge as a practitioner (and student!) and helping them to develop critical thinking and empower them to be brilliant nurses.

Katherine Midgley, Teaching Associate- University of Nottingham

Leadership and management career pathway

Effective leaders are required to use problem-solving processes, maintain group effectiveness and develop group identification. They should also be dynamic, passionate, have a motivational influence on other people, be solution-focused and seek to inspire others.

Senior nurses must apply these characteristics to their work in order to win the respect and trust of team members and lead the development of clinical practice. By demonstrating an effective leadership style, these nurses will be in a powerful position to influence the successful development of other staff, ensuring that professional standards are maintained and enabling the growth of competent practitioners.

 

This role has enabled me to branch out my knowledge and skills, not only focusing on clinical abilities but that of leadership and management.

Caroline Hodgson, Deputy Sister & Midwife

 

I am able to make a difference on my ward by implementing changes and improvements.

Rebecca Willis, Ward Sister- Medicine

 

The key component I enjoy is the opportunity to mentor and coach new staff members.

Robin Binks, Matron- Cancer and Associated Specialties

 

It is a real honour to represent nursing and midwifery at local and national level.

Professor Mandie Sunderland, Chief Nurse

 

Service Improvement Pathway

As a Nurse or Midwife in Service Improvement you’ll be responsible for the planning, delivery and implementation of a new policy, service or site, such as improving access to outpatient appointments.

You will work on a broad range of projects in health or healthcare, you might be tasked to review services in specific clinical settings and work with stakeholders such as local health providers, workforce planners and local education and training boards.

 

The variety is definitely the best part of the job.

Laura Gascoigne, Project Nurse- Nursing Development

 

I enjoy being creative and innovative, it’s great having the freedom to express this.

Katy Dand, Shared Governance Council Chair/Midwife

 

I have delivered a number of successful Projects and it is a great feeling when it all works well and goes to plan.

Helen Scrimshire, Programme manager

 

Research and clinical academic careers

Nurse and data image If you believe that nursing is about making a real difference to patients’ lives, then clinical research nursing can provide a stimulating and rewarding career pathway. As a clinical research nurse, you have the opportunity to spend quality time with your patients and help them reach an informed understanding of the treatment options available and provide support throughout their care pathway.

Academic research is a growing career pathway for nurses which is supported by Government funding and allows nurses to undertake training such as Masters degrees and PHDs. These qualifications mean nurses can work autonomously to develop research projects that benefit the patients they work with everyday.

As their work is shared with other healthcare professionals, it can also benefit patients across the country and beyond. The results of their research are also used in nursing education so that nursing practice is based on the best evidence available.

 

This job is great because it is a new role and ever evolving.  I have been lucky enough to shadow other staff members and gain a broader understanding of patient flow and the discharge process.

Sharon Leighton, Chief Nurse Fellow/Staff Nurse

 

I feel like I have the best of both worlds. I get to deliver evidence based care direct to patients, which is the reason I entered the nursing profession.

Dr Louise Bramley, Clinical Academic – Practice Development Matron Research Fellow

 

I love having a job that combines elements of clinical care, education, research, and leadership that is focused on improving patient care, outcomes and experience and inspiring others.

Dr Joseph Manning, Clinical Academic- Senior Research Fellow

 

Clinical research participation can make real differences to patient’s lives and their families. Being part of that ‘difference’ can be very rewarding.

Andrea Bennett, Research Nurse Manager

 

Midwifery careers

Midwives often describe their job as ‘privileged’. The role they have in preparing women for the delivery of new life makes them a vital presence during all stages of pregnancy, labour and the early postnatal period.

As a midwife you would care for and support pregnant women and their babies, before, during and after childbirth. If you would like taking care of the mother’s welfare, and the responsibility of helping to bring babies into the world, this could be the perfect career for you.

There are opportunities to extend your role by taking specialist courses in areas such as enhanced midwifery practice, family planning, teaching in clinical practice, and research.

 

I enjoy knowing that I have informed the management of the progress of IT and maternity systems to the best of my ability.

Alison Bradley, IT Lead Midwife

I love to meet up with participants, knowing that I can communicate as an experienced midwife, and also impact on the provision of evidence to promote safety and wellbeing for mothers and babies.

Gill Kirkwood, Research Midwife

You can be inducing a lady one day, working in the HDU on CLS another and delivering a baby in the pool the following day.

Michelle Beazer, Lead Midwife- Labour Suite and Induction lounge

Healthcare assistants

Healthcare Assistants are required to carry out a number of designated tasks involving direct care, in support of and under the supervision of a registered nurse.

Their close patient contact allows them the opportunity to offer both emotional and physical support for our patients. They are invaluable members of the multi-disciplinary team, involved in tasks such as:

Assisting with meeting the comfort and hygiene needs of patients, including washing/bathing, oral care, escorting to toilet, assisting with bed pans/commodes, making beds.

Assisting registered staff with taking and recording patients’ temperature, pulse, respiration and blood pressure and completing patient fluid charts.

Assisting with meeting the dietary needs of patients which will include distribution of drinks and meals and helping patients to eat and drink as required.

Since 1st April 2015, NUH has been complying with the National Care Certificate Standards. You will undertake a two-week skills academy and following that must successfully complete the Care Certificate within 12 weeks. Many of these standards will require assessment in the clinical area.

You can get information on the care certificate here

Interested?

Whilst previous experience of caring for acutely ill patients would be advantageous, we are also interested in hearing from exceptional individuals without this experience. We want to hear from people with a special talent for caring and compassion, who would be able to go the extra mile to help our patients feel valued and cared for and at all times to treat them with dignity and respect.

We have full-time (37.5 hours per week) and some part time opportunities available. The usual shift patterns at NUH for both full and part time posts are 12 hour day shifts and 12 hour night shifts on internal rotation and will be ward based.

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